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Prof. Tariq Mansoor is presently serving as the Vice-Chancellor, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh. Previously he has also served as Principal, J.N. Medical College, Chief Medical Superintendent, J.N. Medical College Hospital and Chairman, Department of Surgery. He is also the member of Medical Council of India since March 2015 for a period of four years. He is product of the first batch of prestigious Our Lady of Fatima Higher Secondary School, Aligarh. During his school days he has served as House Captain as well as School Captain. He did his MBBS and MS in General Surgery from Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, AMU, Aligarh. A surgeon by profession with special interest in Breast and Thyroid Diseases, Prof. Tariq Mansoor has 33 years of Teaching and 35 years of Clinical experience. He has 90 publications to his credit and has guided 49 Postgraduate Medical Students for their Thesis as Supervisor / Co-Supervisor

Did you ever thought why nuts are your heart’s best buddies?

Did you ever thought why nuts are your heart’s best buddies?

WASHINGTON: Turns out, regular intake of nuts is linked to lower risk of heart rhythm irregularity.

According to a new research conducted by BMJ, eating several servings of nuts every week may help lower the risk of developing the heart rhythm irregularity, atrial fibrillation, also known as heart flutter.

This level of consumption may also lessen the risk of developing heart failure, although the findings are less consistent, the research indicated.

Previous studies have suggested that eating nuts regularly is associated with a lower risk of heart disease/stroke and associated death, but it’s not clear which particular aspects of cardiovascular disease nut consumption may be linked to.

To explore this in more depth, the researchers drew on the completed Food Frequency Questionnaire responses and lifestyle information from more than 61,000 Swedish 45-83 year olds.

Their cardiovascular health was then tracked for 17 years (to the end of 2014) or until death, whichever came first.

People who ate nuts tended to be better educated and to have healthier lifestyles than those who didn’t include nuts in their diet. They were less likely to smoke or to have a history of high blood pressure. And they were leaner, more physically active, drank more alcohol and ate more fruit, and vegetables.

Nut consumption was associated with a lower risk of heart attack, heart failure, atrial fibrillation, and abdominal aortic aneurysm, after taking account of age and sex.

But when several potentially influential known risk factors were accounted for, including lifestyle, general diet, diabetes, and family history, only associations with atrial fibrillation and with heart failure emerged.

The more often nuts were included in the diet, the lower was the associated risk of atrial fibrillation, the findings showed.

Eating a serving of nuts one to three times a month was associated with a lowered risk of just 3 percent, rising to 12 percent when eating them once or twice a week, and to 18 percent when eating them three or more times a week.

The findings for heart failure were less consistent: moderate, but not high, weekly nut consumption was associated with a 20 percent lower risk.

Each additional portion of nuts eaten during the week was associated with a 4 percent lowering in atrial fibrillation risk.

Eating nuts regularly was not associated with a lower risk of the narrowing of the valve serving the heart’s largest artery, the aorta, or with the risk of stroke.

Nuts are a rich source of healthy fats, minerals, and antioxidants, all of which may aid cardiovascular health, the researchers explained.

“Nut consumption or factors associated with this nutritional behaviour may play a role in reducing the risk of atrial fibrillation and possibly heart failure,” they wrote.

The researchers suggested, “Since only a small proportion of this population had moderate (about 5 percent) or high (less than 2 percent) nut consumption, even a small increase in nut consumption may have large potential to lead to a reduction in the incidence of atrial fibrillation and heart failure in this population.”

The study appears in the online journal Heart. (ANI)

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from The Siasat Daily

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